Getting Skirty

Despite the fact that I rarely sew them, I adore skirts. I particularly love the high-waisted full, pleated skirts that are everywhere right now. They seem just the thing for work with a pretty blouse and for play with a tee-shirt. I rocked this little number to the May Canberra Sewing Crew and was pumped that there was just enough sunlight when I got home to take some sweet pics.

I have tried a few skirt patterns (didn’t love them enough to blog), but none of them seemed “right” so armed with some fitting room photos and the measurements of a full pleated RTW dress I set about creating my own pattern.

Tonight on the blog: this sweet skirt using V8998 for the waistband and a self drafted skirt. Also bad pictures and awkward dancing #sewing #completed
(I was so happy with it I decided to do an awkward looking dance)

I used the waistband from Vogue 8998, which is contoured and fits my really well. Then I started on the skirt. I gave it 5 pleats at front and back, inseam pockets and a back zipper. Lots of these RTW skirts have invisible zips, but I was worried that over the waistband it would be hard to zip/not strong enough so I used a regular zip and centre lapped it.

I did have some issues with the pleats – I think perhaps my maths skills need some work as it took me about 4 tried to get the skirt waist to be the same length as the waistband. I’m planning on re-drafting the skirt pieces as I had the same issue with my second version despite carefully re-measuring and making.

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I am really, really happy with the finished product! I used Monet Meets Modern Sateen in Blue/Pink from the remnant warehouse. It’s the perfect fabric for a skirt like this and lovely quality.

Plus as I said this type of skirt is great for dressing up and down. I wore it to a music festival a tee (actually this exact outfit if I’m being honest), and then to work with heels and a blouse. I’ve already made my second version and I’m keen for many more!

Until next time.

P.S. there were more photos, until I realised I had demon eyes in all of them. So instead you get awkward dance and head cut-off pictures. Because of course

A wool workdress

What’s up readers? I have been stitching up a storm lately but neglecting to take photos. I seriously have about 5 unblogged projects rattling around. In other news, I turned 28 last week (am officially old) and started a new job just over a month ago (which is so far both enjoyable and crazy busy). To celebrate, I decided to treat myself to some birthday goodies:

All my birthday presents to myself came at once! #libertyoflondon #mac #lipstickaddict #fabricaholic #nofilter

So onto the dress, it’s another New Look 6723, my fourth I think. What can I say, there’s something so lovely about a pattern that just works. This time I used the pattern’s skirt, but made it a bit fuller though the extremely scientific process of moving the centre front and centre back a little way inwards to add an extra 5 inches or so. I then did a pleat at the princess seams and then another to the side a little. I moved the waistline up a bit as this wool is very drapey and I think it stretched a little and sat too low. I included pockets for the storing of things, as always.

Tonight on the blog: this sweet wool number using New Look 6723 #sewing #sewcialists

The fashion fabric is a gorgeous wool I got from Mood last March, it presses like a dream and although it creases a little more than I would like it holds up to wear very well. The dress bodice is lined with white cotton batiste which I picked up at Spotlight forever ago (sadly this was the last of it – I must pick up dome more) and the skirt with white rayon lining from Fabric.com. I prefer using cotton to line the bodice as I find it comfier. Plus it’s easier to work with on princess seams and doesn’t slip around while cutting.

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There’s not much else to say really, it’s just a simple, classic dress that wears really well. I’m planning on making another in some beige wool as I get so much wear out of this one I thought having another would be just the trick.

PS isn’t my bunny brooch adorable?

Until next time!

Spring is for Shirtdresses

So I can’t remember where I first saw McCall’s 6696 but I remember thinking I should make one. When Mary announced she was hosting the fall Spring of 1000 shirtdresses, I was on it like white on rice.

So I FINALLY took blog photos for the #1000shirtdresses @mccallpatterncompany 6696. In summary: excellent pattern but the back gathers are not my thing. Blog link in profile :)

For my first go round I used this sweet floral lawn, originally from Lincraft, which I picked up from eBay in a bulk lot of floral cotton lawns (12 meters for $65! It was fate). I won’t lie, this is some next level Betty Draper red wine and chain smoking stuff. I also won’t lie about how much I love it.

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This pattern was a dream to work with. For once I actually followed the instructions (which were great) as it’s full of things I either never or rarely do. The last time I tried to construct a collar it did not go well. Same for the last time I attempted a button-closure. This time they both came out great. There is a lot of hand stitching involved, which worked for me because I love to sit in front of the TV and hand stitch away. If that’s not your thing you could always topstitch.

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I sewed a 16D, based on my measurements and it fits pretty much perfectly. There is, however one problem with this dress… THE HUNCHBACK OF DOOM! If you look around at other versions, this seems like a fairly common issue although I think mine looks worse than most. There is just waaaaay to much fabric in those gathers for my liking. I also think the back is too long, which contributes to the bunching right above the waistband. On my next version I’m going to shorten the back and take out some of that excess, which I think will solve the problem just fine. Next time I will also do a full bicep adjustment because I find the sleeves a tiny bit tight. In the meantime, I’ve found that if I want to go sans cardigan tucking the excess fabric in behind a belt works a treat to hide the issue.

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All in all, however this dress gets a massive thumbs up!

A (very) late very Merry Christmas!

Why hello there!

Merry Christmas! This year's Christmas Dress is @simplicity_creative_group S2444 in a crafting cotton from @lincraft #sewcialists #sewing

I did mean to post this earlier, but was quite distracted by the holiday season, which in joyous news included my grandmother’s 90th birthday, in less joyous, our first Christmas without my mother.

I got some sweet goodies, including a bunch of Hello Kitty stuff from SS and some adorable fashion illustrations from my half sister, K.

But you’re here for the sewing, yes? This year I decided it would be fun to make a Christmas dress for both the big day and any other Christmas-ey events. I used the old faithful Simplicity 2444, this time with a FBA! I think it turned out ok, but there is room for improvement – the area directly under my bust is now too loose by far. I’m not sure why this ALWAYS happens so badly with FBAs. It leave with S shaped princess seams and darts that look insane.

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Speaking of darts, they were also a solid inch too long. I have decided that I must have a low bust or something as this is a fairly consistent problem.

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I used the facing for the neckline, but some purchased bias binding for the armholes. As a twice a year dress I think it’s just fine. Bonus, it was not too hot in the QLD heat!

Until next time.

Flapper-Gasted

Today on bows&bunnies: this 1920s style dress #sewing #sewcialists

This year my department’s Christmas part had a 1920s theme, so of course I had to make something appropriate for the occasion. In the end I decided to go for a garden-party type look with this as my inspiration:

I used Simplicity 2599 as the base and simply added a gathered dirnl skirt. I used my pleating foot to gather the skirt, so much father than basting and gathering by hand!

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I liked S2599 for this as it’s pretty long so I knew I would be able to make it drop waisted easily. I also liked that it was for multiple cup sizes and included a dart. I made a size 18, however even for this look it was much too big and I ended up taking 10-15cm of the width out. Next time I think I would size down to a 12D for something that is the size I would wear everyday.

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I used bias binding around the neckline and topstitched it with one of my machines (many) decorative stitches. I also added some trip to the bottom to make it a touch longer and add more details.For the finishing touches I added a ribbon and broach around the dropped waist, a long string of pearls, and an old scarf from Alannah Hill in my hair.

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All in all this was a pretty quick project, right until the end I was convinced that I would hate it and it would be terribly unflattering. While it’s not the best look on me, I have to say I think the finished product is pretty cute. Not to mention one of the most comfortable things I own!

Until next time!

A fancy dress for a fancy occassion

So a few weeks back one of my cousins, J, got married. I probably know her best of my cousins on that side of the family as she lived with my grandmother for a long time. I was super excited to be invited to her wedding and (of course!) made a new dress for the occasion.

#bpsewvember days 27+28 best make + hem: this silk dress I made for my cousins wedding. Underlined in silk organza with an enormous amount of catch stitching, not to mention the full lining. Then I did a hand rolled hem on the enormous skirt.

This is my third version of New Look 6723, this time with the skirt from the By Hand London Flora. I have to say I adore the skirt of flora. So big & twirly!

This dress was made of a lightweight sky blue crepe-back satin I got for $10/m of eBay, the bodice was underlined in blue silk organza and the whole dress had a lining in silver/grey silk/cotton. I used the machine to finish the lining and overcast its seams but French seamed the fashion fabric and hand stitched it’s rolled hem. I think this hem looks really pretty and delicate in fine fabrics.

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I hand stitched in my underlining using silk thread before assembling the bodice. I found it easier to use the organza as pattern pieces and roughly trim the silk before stitching them together and cutting it to the correct size.

Technique: underlining. This one is silk organza to add a little body to a soft and fragile crepe back silk satin. #bpsewvember @bimbleandpimble

I am pretty pleased with how this turned out – underlining with the organza was a great move, as it allowed me to catch stitch all the seams in the bodice down. I think this helped smooth out the princess seams, although I must admit they are still not perfect – I was too afraid to press the silk as much as I wanted to.

Catch stitching queen! #sewing

I adjusted my FBA a tiny bit more, smoothing out the curve and trimming my altered pattern piece so I could sew the seam at 10mm rather than 15mm.

#bpsewvember day 17: fit. The FBA! I only just started doing them, but things fit SO MUCH BETTER now. 100% worth the effort!

I also changed the back to be a “V” shape. I love the way this looks with a higher neckline. My facing did not go entirely to plan (you can see it poking out a little here), but I’m pretty happy with it nonetheless.

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All in all I’m pretty thrilled with it, I got a lot of complements and it was wonderful to dance in.

Until next time!

What do you mean no one needs 20 floral dresses?

Oh look, something new and different: a floral fit and flare dress! This time with a pretty quilting cotton from fabric.com.

Today on the blog: yet another floral dress. #sewing #sewcialists

This is actually the first version of New Look 6723, complete with original skirt and slightly dodgy FBA (I got better, I promise!).

So I sewed I a 12 in the front bodice and 12 in the neckline/shoulders graded to a 16 in the back of the bodice. I then did a 3″ FBA (I should have done 4 I think as it’s still a little tight) and took some of the extra ease that created in the waist back out. I then took a little out directly under the bust where it was a tiny bit loose. I am pretty happy with the way the bodice fits now. It took two muslins, but I used the second as lining, as is my usual practice.

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For the skirt, I cut the biggest size as it looked disappointingly non-full. For me, it still wasn’t full enough for the gathers to look good so I did two pleats on each side at the front and a box pleat in each side at the back instead. I quite like the way this looks and think it would be nice in a work dress. I popped in an invisible zip, which are my new favourite closures now I’ve mastered the invisible zipper foot!

Overall I really like this one. The neckline is super, super pretty and while I found the skirt underwhelming at first I am now pretty pleased with it. Sometimes it’s nice to be unafraid of wind. Next time I think I will put a little cotton tape on the neckline, as sometimes it sticks out a little from my body, particularly when I lean forward. I would also like to add pockets, mostly because I find myself trying to use them even when I don’t have them!

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Thanks to my friend T for taking photos again!

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Hello Halloween!

As a small child, I never “did” Halloween. My mum hated us Aussies importing American holiday traditions. These days, however, I’ll take any excuse to dress up!

Today on the blog, my super cute Halloween dress made using New Look 6723 #sewing link in profile :)

This little number is New Look 6723, with the skirt of McCall’s 6696, skirt front cut on the fold.

This is actually my second go at 6723, I made a version a few weeks back (which is next in line to be blogged!) with the sweetheart neckline. I decided to do my first “real” FBA and was super pleased with the results. For this version, I used the high, boat neckline and amended my FBA a little for a better fit. I used the 12 in the neck and armholes and did a FBA. Because I curve in quite a lot under my bust, I reshaped that area in this version, taking it to match my curves.

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I am completely thrilled with the finished product! It is the best fitting thing I have made so far and it’s amazing what a difference that makes.

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My fabric is a cute “scary cupcake” quilting cotton, I think by Michael Miller. My brother got it for me last Christmas (yes, it did take me almost 10 months to use it!).

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This isn’t the last time I’ll make this dress. I’m in the process of making a fancy silk version for my cousin’s wedding, and I also think it will be great for work. Hooray for learning new fitting techniques!

The power of ponte

You guys I have a new fabric love. I am OBSESSED with ponte!

On the blog tonight: Simplicity 2444 in ponte #sewing #sewcialists

I picked up this Ponte de Roma from Spotlight a month or two back, after wearing a (purchased) ponte dress a few times and falling in love with the fit + comfort combo. I did a bit of searching and realised there are multiple forms of ponte, so I decided to roll with one similar to the fabric of my dress. It’s a Rayon/Polyester/Spandex blend with a higher rayon than polyester content.

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After the silk Anna dress the ponte was a dream to sew with. It all came together very quickly due to the easy care fabric and lack of handstitching (ok there is a tiny bit on the collar back, you can’t hold a hand-stitcher down!). Plus ponte doesn’t ravel so I skipped the seam finishing #superlazy #sorrynotsorry.

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This is Simplicity 2444, in size 14. The last 14 I sewed in this pattern was a little tight, so I figured it would be perfect for the stretchy ponte. In addition, due to the stretch I figured I could get away with not doing a FBA, which I noticed I REALLY need after the last version. I did add about an inch of width to each sleeve as I find this pattern runs tight in that area.

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I made the collar and pockets from the cotton/silk blend I used to underline the silk Anna dress and love the way they turned out. I particularly enjoy sliding my hands into the silky pockets. Is it weird to enjoy stroking nice fabric?

The only thing I would change is lowering the bust darts a little.

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These photos were taken by my awesome friend T, who is a budding seamstress herself. Her super-cute puppy Woflie posed with me in the shot above :)

I have worn this at ;east once a week to work since finishing itI am already planning a work wardrobe full of comfy ponte! Looks like real clothes, feels like pyjamas!

A dress for a wedding

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Those that follow me on instagram would have seen some of the pictures of this as a work in progress. It spent a lot of time in progress to be honest. I’m not sure how many hours it took me to make this dress, probably at least 30, maybe more. There is a TON of hand sewing which was time consuming, then add on french seams and some misadventures in measurment and you have one time consuming dress!

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The fabric is a pink silk satin that I got from Tessuti while in sydney a few months back. Origionally it was going to line a coat, but I found fabric I liked better for that one so repurposed it. the bodice is underlined (more hand stitching!) with a silk/cotton blend. The skirt is unlined, however as the fabric is slightly sheer I am wearing a (purchased) white slip under it.

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So lets talk about some of the disasters of this project: because I used the bodice from one size but the pleats from another I knew my skirt panels would not line up. To combat this, I measured the bodice against the skirt panels and cut them to match at the waist, grading out over my hips. Unfortunatly I made a big mistake in trying to cut the centre front skirt panel on the fold. It ended up being 3-4 cm too short to match. Cue FREAK OUT. I knew that unpicking the seams to let them out a little would probably not work as the fabric is so fine it was bound to leave holes and loook awful. Instead I decided to cut from the top of the skirt until it matched the bodice, diameter wise, if not along the seams. This point being 3 inches down. This left me with two new problems, firstly, the seams no where near aligned, and secondly the dress was now an awkward length, too long for a midi, not long enough for a gown.

I decided to add some ribbon to the waistband to (sort of) solve problem #1. For problem #2 I added a 3 inch strip of fabric to the bottom. I was prepared to hide that with ribbon as well, but in the end decided it looked more “design feature” than horrible. Or at least that’s what I’m telling myself!

Disasters aside, I adore this dress. It’s probably near to being my best work and I did so many new things for the first time. I am particularly proud of my hand rolled hem and the invisible zipper. I have come to the conclusion that I (and I suspect other seamstresses) are much more inclined to notice flaws in our work than anyone else. Plus a very drunk girl told me I looked like a princess, so I’m calling it a winner!

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I wore it to the wedding of my dear friend A, who looked like a princess herself and positivly glowed with joy. It was a wonderful afternoon/evening and I just know her and her new husband will spend many joyful years together.

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Until next time!